Apr 27

Eovaldi ho!

Scene from Wednesday. © Jon SooHoo/Los Angeles Dodgers 2012

Haven’t done a links post in a while … so let’s catch up.

  • Nathan Eovaldi is headed to Los Angeles, but we don’t know yet whom he is replacing on the roster, writes Eric Stephen of True Blue L.A.
  • The move is interesting in part because Todd Coffey and Ronald Belisario have begun their minor-league rehab outings, reports Ken Gurnick of MLB.com. Coffey can be activated Sunday, Belisario a week from today.
  • As Magic Johnson prepares to officially become a Dodger co-owner, Michael Jordan’s 7-59 Charlotte Bobcats wrapped up the worst winning percentage for a team in NBA history, .106.
  • J.P Hoonstra of the Daily News got a first-hand look at Dodger pitching prospect Zach Lee at Rancho Cucamonga, where the pitching coach is none other than Matt Herges.
  • Guest-posting at Mike Scioscia’s Tragic Illness, Christopher Jackson offers a position-by-position update on the Albuquerque Isotopes. My favorite note: Luis Cruz’s “imitation of teammate Trent Oeltjen’s Australian accent is a sight to behold.”
  • ThinkBlueL.A. has expanded from a forum into a full-fledged blog, led by friend of Dodger Thoughts and fellow Bluetopia co-star Ron Cervenka. Evan Bladh of Opinion of Kingman’s Performance is also contributing.
  • ESPNLosAngeles.com had an interesting way of summing up Albert Pujols’ trials in a headline: “James Loney Has 1 HR.”
  • Eno Sarris’ interview at Fangraphs with Stanford baseball “dean of stats” Dean Stotz is interesting. Sample: “Fifty percent of the time, the hitters take the first pitch. Twenty-six percent of the time, they hit it foul. Twenty-four percent of the time they put it in play —- and only 33% of those balls are hits. That means —- if you throw a first-pitch strike —- 92% of the time, you’ll get an out or an 0-1 count.”
  • Jackie Robinson movie 42 is set to be released April 12, three days before the next Jackie Robinson Day, reports Dave McNary of Variety.
  • As part of his 30 baseball books in 30 days series, Tom Hoffarth of the Daily News reviews Willie Mays Aikens: Safe at Home.
  • For my TV-viewing friends, this post by Mitch Metcalf of Showbuzz Daily might be of interest: “What Does a Tenth of a Rating Point Really Mean?”
  • Chess boxing? Chess boxing???
Mar 05

Sons of anarchy: Next-gen Dodgers turn White Sox upside down

Dodgers 6, White Sox 4

Highlights:

  • In the sixth inning, four sons of former major leaguers – Tony Gwynn Jr. (single), Justin Sellers (double), Ivan De Jesus Jr. (triple) and Scott Van Slyke (booming home run) – produced a cycle for the generations.
  • Chad Billingsley retired six of seven batters on 21 total pitches, a feat chronciled by Tony Jackson of ESPNLosAngeles.com.
  • Winning pitcher Angel Guzman retired all four batters he faced.
  • Andre Ethier had the Dodgers’ first hit of the spring, a double, and first run. Ethier looked physically fit legging out the two-bagger, writes J.P Hoonstra of the Daily News.
  • Josh Fields went 2 for 2.
  • Three of Nathan Eovaldi’s five outs were strikeouts.
  • Adam Kennedy made a great defensive play at third base on behalf of Billingsley.
  • Scott Rice struck out two in his inning of relief.

Lowlights:

  • Eovaldi allowed two hits and two walks.
  • Matt Kemp and Dee Gordon were among seven 0-for-2 Dodgers.
  • Ryan Tucker allowed two runs in the ninth inning.

Sidelights:

  • Attention, Double-A Dodgers and friends: Chattanooga will be the site of some filming of 42, the upcoming Jackie Robinson feature starring Chadwick Boseman (with Harrison Ford as Branch Rickey and Christopher Meloni as Leo Durocher), and the filmmakers will casting for local ballplayers to appear, according to Nooga.com.
  • Clayton Kershaw and Kenley Jansen made the Crashburn Alley “Unbeatable” team aimed at winning each of the next 10 World Series. (And Davey Lopes was named first-base coach.) Kemp, I gather, was considered too old?
  • Mark Sweeney has left his front-office job with the Dodgers to become a Padres TV analyst.
  • Daily News sportswriter Jon Gold wrote a moving obituary for his sister, Amy Wishnie. You’ll not read anything more meaningful for some time.